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Report

Why Aren't Revenue Estimates More Accurate?

November 1, 1984 - Revenue estimates play a crucial role in the state's budget process. The Legislature relies heavily on these estimates in deciding at what levels to fund state programs, how much money should be 11 put aside in reserves, and whether taxes should be raised or lowered. Consequently, the more accurate revenue estimates are, the more successful the Legislature can be in accomplishing its fiscal objectives--that is, selecting a combination of expenditure levels and tax rates that best meets the public's need and willingness to pay for services without giving rise to unwanted budget surpluses or deficits. In contrast, the more inaccurate revenue estimates prove to be, the more difficult it becomes for the Legislature to attain its objectives and manage the state's fiscal affairs effectively.


Report

Demonstration Programs in Reading and Mathmatics: A Review

November 1, 1984 - This report was prepared pursuant to a requirement contained in Chapter 1270, Statutes of 1983 (SB 1155).


Report

Why Aren't Revenue Esitmates More Accurate?

November 1, 1984 - Revenue estimates play a crucial role in the state's budget process. The Legislature relies heavily on these estimates in deciding at what levels to fund state programs, how much money should be "put aside" in reserves, and whether taxes should be raised or lowered. Consequently, the more accurate revenue estimates are, the more successful the Legislature can be in accomplishing its fiscal objectives--that is, selecting a combination of expenditure levels and tax rates that best meets the public's need and willingness to pay for services without giving rise to unwanted budget surpluses or deficits. In contrast, the more inaccurate revenue estimates prove to be, the more difficult it becomes for the Legislature to attain its objectives and manage the state's fiscal affairs effectively.


Report

Demonstration Programs in Reading and Mathematics: a Review

November 1, 1984 - This report was prepared pursuant to a requirement contained in Chapter 1270, Statutes of 1983 (SB 1155).


Presentation

Unemployment and Disability Insurance

October 23, 1984 - Statement to the Assembly Finance and Insurance Subcommittee on Unemployment and Disability Insurance, Sacramento, October 23, 1984


Presentation

Orange County Board of Supervisors' Legislative Seminar

October 22, 1984 - Speech to the Orange County Board of Supervisors' Legislative Seminar.


Presentation

Santa Barbara County Annual Training Seminar

October 11, 1984 - SPEECH TO SANTA BARBARA COUNTY ANNUAL TRAINING SEMINAR, VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE - OCTOBER 11, 1984


Report

Final Summary of Major Financial Legislation Enacted During 1984

October 1, 1984 - This report summarizes the fiscal effect of legislation enacted during the 1984 Regular Session of the California Legislature. It is intended to supplement and update our July 1984 report entitled: Summary of Legislative Action on the Budget Bill, 1984-85 Fiscal Year.


Report

Assessment of Weight Fees on Farm Vehicles in California

October 1, 1984 - The construction and maintenance of California's highway system is financed primarily with tax revenues from two sources: (l) federal and state taxes assessed on the sale of gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) weight fees imposed on commercial vehicles weighing more than 2,000 pounds.


Report

Final Summary of Major Financial Legislation Enacted During 1984

October 1, 1984 - This report summarizes the fiscal effect of legislation enacted during the 1984 Regular Session of the California Legislature. It is intended to supplement and update our July 1984 report entitled: Summary of Legislative Action on the Budget Bill, 1984-85 Fiscal Year.


Report

The Fiscal Impact of Proposition 36, the Jarvis Property Tax Initiative

September 25, 1984 - Testimony Before the Senate Governmental Organization Committee and the Joint Committee on the State's Economy.


Presentation

Proposition 41: Public Aid and Medical Assistance Programs

September 24, 1984 - Statement to a joint meeting of the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services and Assembly Human Services Committee, Sacramento, September 24, 1984.


Report

Public Assistance in California: Facts and Figures

September 1, 1984 - Decisions affecting California's two primary welfare programs--Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), which provides cash grants to needy children and their parents, and Supplemental Security Income/State Supplementary program (SSI/SSP}, which provides cash grants to the aged, blind, and disabled--are among the more important decisions that the Legislature must make. There are two reasons for this. First, these decisions can have a more immediate and dramatic impact on the lives of individual Californians than is the case with most other decisions it makes. This is particularly true when issues affecting eligibility are being resolved. Second, these two programs are among the most costly administered by the state. Together, they account for 11 cents out of every dollar spent from the state's General Fund.


Report

Assessment of Weight Fees on Farm Vehicles in California

September 1, 1984 - The construction and maintenance of California's highway system is financed primarily with tax revenues from two sources: (I) federal and state taxes assessed on the sale of gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2)weight fees imposed on commercial vehicles weighing more than 2,000 pounds.


Report

Public Assistance in California: Facts and Figures

September 1, 1984 - Decisions affecting California's two primary welfare programs--Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), which provides cash grants to needy children and their parents, and Supplemental Security Income/State Supplementary program (SSI/SSP), which provides cash grants to the aged, blind, and disabled--are among the more important decisions that the Legislature must make. There are two reasons for this. First, these decisions can have a more immediate and dramatic impact on the lives of individual Californians than is the case with most other decisions it makes. This is particularly true when issues affecting eligibility are being resolved. Second, these two programs are among the most costly administered by the state. Together, they account for 11 cents out of every dollar spent from the state's General Fund.